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view of bridge to downtown area

Overview

An enriching experience

This program explores the historical context for the civil rights struggle that continues today. Journey from Jackson, Mississippi to Montgomery, Alabama, by way of Tennessee and Arkansas, visiting some of the most iconic sites of the 1960s civil rights movement. Visit churches, museums, exhibits and memorials and hear firsthand accounts from people who lived these experiences.

Listen to soul and blues performances where this music originated and tour the entertainment district in Memphis. Feast on Southern-style dishes at cafés and restaurants that civil rights activists once patronized. Meet with people from all walks of life who have devoted themselves to civil rights issues and explore sites dedicated to challenging racial injustice and pointing a way toward societal healing.

Dates

June 19–26, 2022

Duration

8 days

Price

From $5,595 per person

Trip size

28 participants

Minimum age

18 years

Faculty leader

A different kind of classroom

With renowned Stanford faculty and scholars leading the way, every Travel/Study trip is a one-of-a-kind educational experience.

Doug McAdam

Sociology

The author or co-author of over a dozen books, Professor McAdam is widely credited as one of the pioneers of the political process model in social movement analysis.

Itinerary

Exploring cultural and historical sites in the South

Learn side by side about the leaders and events of the civil rights movement as we travel from Mississippi to Arkansas, Tennessee and Alabama, stopping at churches, museums, exhibits and memorials to hear firsthand accounts from people who lived these experiences.

  • Jackson, Mississippi

    Arrive in Jackson and transfer to our hotel. In the early afternoon, walk to the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum. This state-funded museum provides an honest and painful account of the civil rights movement in Mississippi through a series of galleries packed floor to ceiling with photographs, texts and recordings. Explore the museum independently before gathering with fellow travelers this evening back at our hotel for a welcome orientation and a dinner using locally-sourced ingredients.

    Accommodations:

    Westin Jackson

    Included meal: Dinner
  • Jackson

    Today’s focus is Farish Street, the thriving center of African American life in the Jim Crow era. Begin at the Medgar and Myrlie Evers Home National Monument. Medgar Evers, the field secretary for the NAACP in Mississippi, was assassinated in the driveway of his Jackson home in 1963. Gather with monument staff to discuss the Everses’ life and the history of the movement. From here drive to Malaco Records, an independent record label based in Jackson and the home of many major blues and gospel acts. Meet with the co-founder for a tour and a discussion of the label’s history, focusing on local artists and songwriters. Stop by the Big Apple Inn, where owner Geno Lee will be on hand to receive the group and tell his family story. The restaurant played host to civil rights leaders and Freedom Riders; Medgar Evers rented an office upstairs. Have lunch nearby before continuing on to the COFO (Council of Federated Organizations) Civil Rights Education Center to meet with Robert Luckett, director of the Margaret Walker Center and an associate professor of history at Jackson State University. On our way back to the hotel, we pass by the former Greyhound Bus station, which played a prominent role in the 1961 Freedom Rides and is now lovingly renovated in the art deco style. This evening enjoy dinner together before a private blues performance by a local musician.

    Accommodations:

    Westin Jackson

    Included meals: Breakfast, lunch and dinner
  • Jackson / Mississippi Delta / Little Rock, Arkansas

    Depart the busy capital city of Jackson early this morning and drive north through the flatlands of the Mississippi Delta. We stop first in Indianola to visit the B.B. King Museum and Delta Interpretive Center, whose mission is to empower, unite and heal through music, art and education and share the rich cultural heritage of the Mississippi Delta. Next drive to Greenwood and the Museum of the Mississippi Delta, where we will meet and dine with Sylvester and Mary Hoover, owners of Hoover’s Grocery and Laundry in the Baptist Town neighborhood. Mary, an accomplished cook, owned a popular soul-food restaurant, which led to her experience catering meals and being cast as an extra in the movie The Help, filmed nearby. After lunch, Sylvester will accompany our group to Money and the remains of Bryant’s Grocery, the site associated with the murder of black teenager Emmett Till, who was visiting his Mississippi cousins from Chicago in August 1955. Stop in Sumner at the Emmett Till Interpretive Center, which exists to tell the story of the tragedy and point a way toward racial healing. Dine at the Sumner Grille and contemplate the day’s experiences on the drive to Little Rock this evening.

    Accommodations:

    Burgundy Hotel

    Included meals: Breakfast, lunch and dinner
  • Little Rock / Memphis, Tennessee

    This morning tour the Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site, an operating public high school and a national emblem of the often violent struggle over school desegregation. Our group will meet with Elizabeth Eckford, one of the Little Rock Nine, in the school library. Take time to explore the visitor center before continuing to the Clinton Presidential Center for a tour and lunch. Pass by the Daisy and L.C. Bates Home, a haven for the Little Rock Nine and the official pick-up and drop-off site for their trips to and from Central High School each school day. Continue to Memphis, check in to our hotel and enjoy a barbecue dinner together.

    Accommodations:

    Hu Hotel

    Included meals: Breakfast, lunch and dinner
  • Memphis

    After breakfast head to the Lorraine Motel, now the home of the National Civil Rights Museum, for a private tour and independent exploration. A large white wreath hangs on the balcony outside Room 306, which has been preserved to capture what it looked like on April 4, 1968, when Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on the balcony while in town to support a sanitation workers’ strike. Have lunch in the Soulsville neighborhood before visiting the Stax Museum of American Soul Music, which tells the story of the integrated record label and its unique Memphis sound. Explore Memphis’s culinary scene independently for dinner.

    Accommodations:

    Hu Hotel

    Included meals: Breakfast and lunch
  • Memphis / Birmingham, Alabama / Selma / Montgomery

    Our morning begins with an early drive to Birmingham. You may rest or listen to the materials we’ll share along the way. Arrive at the 16th Street Baptist Church, where we will meet with Reverend Carolyn McKinstry, who was 14 and inside the church when a bomb planted by white supremacists killed four young girls in September 1963. View Kelly Ingram Park across the street, site of civil rights rallies, demonstrations and confrontations. Continue our journey to Selma, where we will see the Brown Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church, from which three marches from Selma to Montgomery began. At the nearby Selma Interpretive Center, converse with movement foot soldier Annie Pearl Avery, whose civil rights work spans decades. Walk across the Edmund Pettus Bridge before driving the 54-mile Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail, which commemorates the route of the 1965 Voting Rights March in Alabama. Dinner this evening is on our own.

    Accommodations:

    Renaissance Montgomery Hotel

    Included meals: Breakfast and lunch
  • Montgomery

    Our last day of touring together begins at the Dexter Parsonage Museum, the house in which Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was living when it was bombed in January 1956 and where he made his personal commitment to nonviolence. Continue to the Legacy Museum: From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration. Created by the Equal Justice Initiative, the museum investigates the history of racial injustice and the narratives that have sustained injustice across generations. After lunch in the museum complex, take time to reflect at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, a six-acre memorial that uses sculpture, art and design to contextualize racial terror. End the afternoon with a briefing by staff members of the Equal Justice Initiative. Share our experiences during a farewell reception and dinner at a local restaurant.

    Accommodations:

    Renaissance Montgomery Hotel

    Included meals: Breakfast, lunch and dinner
  • Montgomery / Home

    Transfer independently to the airport for flights home.

    Included meal: Breakfast

Trip details

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aerial view of downtown skyline at sunrise

Pricing

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The price of your trip covers a comprehensive educational program in addition to meals, accommodations, tours and excursions. Continue reading for a full list of what’s included.

view of central high school building

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