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The Alumni Blog : July, 2011

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    The Huffington Post on the Creative Economy

    The Huffington Post has invited our team to cove the Creative Economy. We look forward to connect their 40 million readers with the creative profession, helping them to understand how design can contribute to their lives and the world.

    We already have posts up, check out:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/soren-petersen/the-creative-economy_b_905691.html

    Please let me know what you would like to share with the public and if there are any topics you like to see covered the next couple of months.

    If you are interested in collaborating with our Stanford team, please see our site for more information:

    https://www.stanford.edu/group/designx_lab/cgi-bin/mainwiki/index.php/Design_Quantification_Lab_%28DQL%29_Initiative?

    &n...

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    Posted by Dr. Soren Ingomar Petersen on Jul 26 2011 9:43AM | 1 comments

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    Biking in the Snow - An Exercise in Hypothermia

    My last post gave an overview of the bike tour that Cameron and I did in Colorado in June. I hinted there that I would be describing Day 2 of the 7-day expedition, so here you go.

    Day 2 - a ride from Estes Park (Elev. 7,500') to Granby (Elev. 8,000') via Rocky Mountain National Park's Trail Ridge Road (Maximum Elev. 12,183') - was a near disaster. We knew that a cold front of some kind was approaching, and a healthy chance of rain was forecast, with temps expected to be in the low 40s up at the summit. The night before, we awoke to...

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    Posted by Mr. Marty Beene on Jul 26 2011 7:43AM | 0 comments

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    State of the Student: See Ya, Mom!

    When your first child leaves for college, there is a gaping hole in your life. The child that you so carefully cared for and natured for 18+ years is suddenly gone. When your second child leaves home, the loss is less severe, since you know what to expect.

    When my youngest left for Stanford, I became a proverbial ‘empty nester.’ But, since we live just a baseball toss from the University, the change was more one of degree than substance. Somehow, the fact that home was just a few miles away meant that the separation (at least for me) did not carry the agony or grief of the first loss.

    And then something begins to happen. The house that seemed preternaturally quiet without the thumping sounds of hip hop music, mad dashes out to school, friends coming and going, etc. suddenly seems…peaceful. I could sleep in past 6:45 am. I could watch what I wanted on TV.  No more school lunches! And there was less laundry. Lots  less ...

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    Posted by Ms. Charlene Scholtes Margot on Jul 24 2011 1:21PM | 0 comments

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    Manly-Man Father-Son Bonding

    I had the opportunity to do some manly-man father-son bonding in June, when my wife Pamela reported that a big crunch at work over the whole summer was going to keep her in the office instead of on vacation somewhere with us. We decided to try to tackle the Bicycle Tour of Colorado, which is a week-long, fully supported bike tour for up to 1,500 riders. This year, the selected route amounted to 420 miles (and around 30,000 vertical feet of climbing!) to be covered in six days of riding, with a rest day included after the first four days. The big selling point for this year's route was that the Day 2 itinerary would take us up and over Trail Ridge Road in Rocky Mountain National Park.

    With my

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    Posted by Mr. Marty Beene on Jul 21 2011 7:34AM | 0 comments

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    Stanford Design Quantification Lab - initiative

     

     

     

    Greetings,

    We are delighted to announce the launch of the Stanford Design Quantification Lab initiative, a new laboratory at Stanford Center for Design Research.

    Our vision is for business opportunities and design execution to be founded in shared interests, fair dealings and action oriented thinking, supported by objective metrics while encouraging the exploration of alternative paths to sustainable progress.

    The mission of our lab are creating, detailing, validating and testing of front-end metrics and methods, predicting success of products, services, agendas and policies in any organization, whether private or public, using triple-bottom line metrics. These methods support actionable framing and communication of complex design challenges.

    Collectively we contribute a decade of design research into how to integrate design into busine...

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    Posted by Dr. Soren Ingomar Petersen on Jul 18 2011 2:41PM | 0 comments

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    Longing for the (Not So) Good Old Days

    I like to think that over time, we are becoming more enlightened and embrace progress, which is why I usually roll my eyes when people resist change with the refrain of, “I grew up with…, and I turned out fine.”  I grew up with asbestos ceilings, but I’m not going to knowingly put asbestos in my house, even if I think I turned out fine.

    But every now and then, I do yearn to hearken back to bygone days of parenting, back when:

    1. It was OK to hit your kids.  I’m not saying that I want to use my kids as punching bags and take my frustrations out on them.  But I can’t argue with the effectiveness with an occasional spanking for serious offenses.  For example, the other day, the kids snuck out during their afternoon nap and went into our exercise room, which they are not allowed in without adult supervision.  It only takes the thought of a 10-pound weight dropped on a toddler’s fo...

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    Posted by Ms. Eileen Hung-Kwong Tse on Jul 17 2011 3:39PM | 2 comments

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    I'm Back - Finally!

    It's been months since I've posted an entry here (and "here" is now different than the original "Life with Junior" blog!). I have an excuse, actually, not counting just being busy in February: back in early March, I sneezed. Yes, that's it. Of course, the sneeze itself wasn't why I stopped posting. It was the weird back injury that resulted from it. I've never had any back problems, other than an occasional sore muscle after pulling weeds in the garden or whatever. But there I was - literally! - flat on my back for an entire week. I couldn't work because I couldn't find any even partially sitting position so that I could use a computer. In a way, that was OK because I did have sick time saved up and I got some use out of my Stanford snuggie, but it was frustrating.

    Then, just about the time my chiropractor had my back feeling better,...

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    Posted by Mr. Marty Beene on Jul 8 2011 8:47AM | 0 comments

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    Lemonade from Lemons: Stanford Twins and The Power of Two 7/6/11

    Hello Stanford alums! My name is Isabel Stenzel Byrnes (Class of 1994) and I have written sporadically for the "Living Well" blog. I'm a social worker and health educator, and currently work for the Lucile Packard Pediatric Weight Control Program. It's nice to be back after a hectic few months, and finally find(or make) time to share a little bit about what has been going on.

    Have you ever found yourself stuck with a situation you didn't want? Some challenge lands on your lap without any notice? You gripe and whine and wish it wasn't so. You trudge through the mud, with a little 'whoas me,' and then, slowly, with patience and attention, you realize there are some gifts and joys that come out of that challenge.

    Illness can sometimes be like that. That has been the case for my twin sister Anabel (Class of 1994) and myself. When we were students at Stanford, we struggled with advanced cystic fibrosis (CF), and, with patience, hard work, and the blessin...

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    Posted by Isabel Stenzel Byrnes, M.P.H. on Jul 6 2011 11:09AM | 0 comments

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    I Don't Want to be the Only One: Why I'm Helping Get Women Elected in 2012

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    In January, The Unofficial Stanford Blog posted a picture of me handing out free condoms in White Plaza to celebrate the anniversary of Roe v. Wade. Excited to share the news, I sent out the link to family and friends. Within a half an hour, I received a reply from my mom: “Oh well, I guess my daughter won’t be president.”

    Some people might point to my political views as the reason I would not get elected to office; in fact, my gender is a more historically grounded reason to believe I would not make it to an elected position. Besides the fact the U.S has yet to elect a female president, only 17% of Congress and 23% of state legislatures are women.

           &n...

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    Posted by Ms. Natalie Joelle Goodis on Jul 5 2011 12:56PM | 0 comments